Billy Bragg: long statement re: Morrissey on Facebook (7 July, 2019)


"Last Sunday, while much of the British media were lauding Stormzy’s Glastonbury headline show as epoch defining, Morrissey posted a white supremacist video on his website, accompanied by the comment ‘Nothing But Blue Skies for Stormzy...The Gallows for Morrissey’. The nine minute clip lifted footage from the grime star’s Pyramid Stage performance while arguing that the British establishment are using him to promote multiculturalism at the expense of white culture.

The YouTube channel of the video’s author contains other clips expressing , among other things, homophobia, racism and misogyny - left wing women of colour are a favourite target for his ire. There are also clips expounding the Great Replacement Theory, a far right conspiracy trope which holds that there is a plot of obliterate the white populations of Europe and North America through mass immigration and cultural warfare.

My first thought was to wonder what kind of websites Morrissey must be trawling in order to be able to find and repost this clip on the same day that it appeared online? I came home from Glastonbury expecting to see some angry responses to his endorsement of white supremacism. Instead, the NME published an interview with Brandon Flowers in which the Killers lead singer proclaimed that Morrissey was still “a king”, despite being in what Flowers recognised was “hot water” over his bigoted comments.

As the week progressed, I kept waiting for some reaction to the white supremacist video, yet none was forthcoming. Every time I googled Morrissey, up would pop another article from a music website echoing the NME’s original headline: ‘The Killers Brandon Flowers on Morrissey: ‘He’s Still A King’. I’m well aware from personal experience how easy it is for an artist to find something you’ve said in the context of a longer discourse turned into an inflammatory headline that doesn’t reflect your genuine views on the subject at hand, but I have to wonder if Flowers really understands the ramifications of Morrissey’s expressions of support for the far right For Britain Party?

As the writer of the powerful Killers song ‘Land of the Free’, does he know that For Britain wants to build the kind of barriers to immigration that Flowers condemns in that lyric?
Party leader Anne Marie Walters maintains ties with Generation Identity, the group who both inspired and received funds from the gunman who murdered 50 worshippers at a Christchurch mosque. How does that sit with the condemnation of mass murder by lone gunman in ‘Land of the Free’?

As an explicitly anti-Muslim party, For Britain opposes the religious slaughter of animals without the use of a stun gun, a policy that has given Morrissey a fig leaf of respectability, allowing him to claim he supports them on animal welfare grounds. Yet if that is his primary concern, why does he not support the UK’s Animal Welfare Party, which stood candidates in the recent European elections?

Among their policies, the AWF also aim to prohibit non-stun slaughter. If his only interest was to end this practice, he could have achieved this without the taint of Islamophobia by endorsing them. They are a tiny party, but Morrissey’s vocal support would have given the animal rights movement a huge boost of publicity ahead of the polls.

Instead, he expresses support for anti-Muslim provocateurs, posts white supremacist videos and, when challenged, clutches his pearls and cries “Infamy, infamy, they’ve all got it in for me”. His recent claim that “as a so-called entertainer, I have no rights” is a ridiculous position made all the more troubling by the fact that it is a common trope among right-wing reactionaries.

The notion that certain individuals are not allowed to say certain things is spurious, not least because it is most often invoked after they’ve made their offensive comments. Look closely at their claims and you’ll find that what they are actually complaining about is the fact that they have been challenged.

The concept of freedom pushed by the new generation of free speech warriors maintains that the individual has the right to say whatever they want, whenever they want, to whoever they want, with no comeback. If that is the definition of freedom, then one need look no further than Donald Trump’s Twitter feed as our generation’s beacon of liberty. Perhaps Lady Liberty should be replaced in New York Harbour with a colossal sculpture of the Donald, wearing a toga, holding a gaslight.

Worryingly, Morrissey’s reaction to being challenged over his support of For Britain, his willingness to double down rather than apologise for any offence caused, suggests a commitment to a bigotry that tarnishes his persona as the champion of the outsider. Where once he offered solace to the victims of a cruel and unjust world, he now seems to have joined the bullies waiting outside the school gates.

As an activist, I’m appalled by this transformation, but as a Smiths fan, I’m heartbroken.

It was Johnny Marr’s amazing guitar that drew me to the band, but I grasped that Morrissey was an exceptional lyricist when I heard ‘Reel Around the Fountain’. Ironically, it was a line that he had stolen that won my affections. “I dreamt about you last night and I fell out of bed twice” is spoken by Jimmy, the black sailor, to his white teenage lover, Jo, in Sheila Delaney’s play ‘A Taste of Honey’.

The 1961 movie, starring Rita Tushingham was an early example of a post-war British society that would embrace multi-racial relationships (and homosexuality too). By pilfering that particular line for the song, Morrissey was placing the Smiths in the great tradition of northern working class culture that may have been in the gutter, but was looking at the stars. Yet, by posting a white supremacist video in which he is quoted as saying “Everyone prefers their own race”, Morrissey undermines that line, erasing Jo and Jimmy and all those misfit lovers to whom the Smiths once gave so much encouragement.

A week has passed since the video appeared on Morrissey’s website and nothing has been written in the media to challenge his position. Today it was reported that research by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, a UK based anti-extremist organisation, reveals that the Great Replacement Theory is being promoted so effectively by the far right that it is entering mainstream political discourse.

That Morrissey is helping to spread this idea - which inspired the Christchurch mosque murderer - is beyond doubt. Those who claim that this has no relevance to his stature as an artist should ask themselves if, by demanding that we separate the singer from the song, they too are helping to propagate this racist creed."


Regards,
FWD.

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Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
To give him some dues, I've voiced disagreement to loads of stuff he's said over the yrs on his FB page and recently on Twitter with the Moz thing but out of all the acts from the 80's.....he's one of the more reasonable in terms of not getting abusive and letting you have your say and not instantly going for the block button. Unlike someone like Mike Scott from the Waterboys or Ian McNabb from the Icicle Works (when he had a go at Moz over something and I pointed out he was still selling out arenas, while McNabb was playing small venues - instant block). Having said that, and as fine a songwriter as he has been, whose songs have meant a lot to me at various parts of my life, I'll never agree with him over this or much else politically.
Thankfully, agreeing with him isn’t the pre-condition of an engagement.
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
To give him some dues, I've voiced disagreement to loads of stuff he's said over the yrs on his FB page and recently on Twitter with the Moz thing but out of all the acts from the 80's.....he's one of the more reasonable in terms of not getting abusive and letting you have your say and not instantly going for the block button. Unlike someone like Mike Scott from the Waterboys or Ian McNabb from the Icicle Works (when he had a go at Moz over something and I pointed out he was still selling out arenas, while McNabb was playing small venues - instant block). Having said that, and as fine a songwriter as he has been, whose songs have meant a lot to me at various parts of my life, I'll never agree with him over this or much else politically.
As you might imagine, I felt awkward. But I also felt a need to be honest and accept the outcome.
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
Well, he did both tonight. I really did enjoy it. And it was great to have the release of speaking to him about Morrissey.

I imagine you and him could have a long conversation. I suspect you’d both enjoy it, and you’d each be affected.
 

Stephen Hofmann

Well-Known Member
Well, he did both tonight. I really did enjoy it. And it was great to have the release of speaking to him about Morrissey.

I imagine you and him could have a long conversation. I suspect you’d both enjoy it, and you’d each be affected.

Maybe. I relate to him because we're both from the same neck of the woods. Or at least did. Anyway, good for you for having a word.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
He's stuck in the 80's, like Morgoth says. I had a debate with Joolz the poet, ex-gf of the singer from New Model Army earlier on FB. She's come out with some pretty outlandish stuff about Moz and supporting Bragg but you can't debate her......she's a raving feminist with set hardcore leftist views.
I don't know who "Joolz the poet" is. I found out she has a Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joolz_Denby

I remember the band "New Model Army" very vaguely back in the 1980s: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Model_Army_(band)

I don't know much about the band New Model Army's politics do you know if they are haters of Morrissey?

I remember their was a folk rock band called "The Levellers": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levellers_(band)

A lot who are/were part of Manchester's indie music scene back in the 1980s and 1990s seem to hate Morrissey these days. Do you know what the band "Easterhouse" think of Morrissey these days?

Sad that Ian McNabb of both solo and the "Icicle Works" fame would turn against Morrissey. Pete Wylie has said some nasty stuff about Morrissey as well. It would be interesting to know what others from that New Wave Liverpool indie music scene in the 1980s think of Morrissey these days.

I remember that there was a band called "Squeeze" in the 1980s. Morrissey seems to get on ok with Jools Holland.

You seem to know a lot about British bands/groups from the 1980s. I don't know much about the folk rock band "The Waterboys".

I like some of Billy Bragg's music. However, I find his views about Morrissey really troubling though. Another thing which really worries me is Billy Bragg's anti-Semitic views. Sadly, there is a lot of anti-Semitism within the British Labour Party these days but then there is within the British far-right as well. Morrissey supports the Jewish State of Israel and I admire him for that.

I'm a fan of Morrissey as solo artist I love his latest albums "Low in High School" and "California Son". I also like some of Stormzy's music I love his song "Blinded by Your Grace, Pt. 2" there are some great tracks on Stomzy's debut album "Gang Signs & Prayer". Maybe I'm one of the few people to like both artists.

I remember when Morrissey had an interest in feminism back in the 1980s but he has seen how modern radical feminism has lost it's way it isn't the same anymore. Some say that Anne Marie Waters is a feminist.
 

Stephen Hofmann

Well-Known Member
I don't know who "Joolz the poet" is. I found out she has a Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joolz_Denby

I remember the band "New Model Army" very vaguely back in the 1980s: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Model_Army_(band)

I don't know much about the band New Model Army's politics do you know if they are haters of Morrissey?

I remember their was a folk rock band called "The Levellers": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levellers_(band)

A lot who are/were part of Manchester's indie music scene back in the 1980s and 1990s seem to hate Morrissey these days. Do you know what the band "Easterhouse" think of Morrissey these days?

Sad that Ian McNabb of both solo and the "Icicle Works" fame would turn against Morrissey. Pete Wylie has said some nasty stuff about Morrissey as well. It would be interesting to know what others from that New Wave Liverpool indie music scene in the 1980s think of Morrissey these days.

I remember that there was a band called "Squeeze" in the 1980s. Morrissey seems to get on ok with Jools Holland.

You seem to know a lot about British bands/groups from the 1980s. I don't know much about the folk rock band "The Waterboys".

I like some of Billy Bragg's music. However, I find his views about Morrissey really troubling though. Another thing which really worries me is Billy Bragg's anti-Semitic views. Sadly, there is a lot of anti-Semitism within the British Labour Party these days but then there is within the British far-right as well. Morrissey supports the Jewish State of Israel and I admire him for that.

I'm a fan of Morrissey as solo artist I love his latest albums "Low in High School" and "California Son". I also like some of Stormzy's music I love his song "Blinded by Your Grace, Pt. 2" there are some great tracks on Stomzy's debut album "Gang Signs & Prayer". Maybe I'm one of the few people to like both artists.

I remember when Morrissey had an interest in feminism back in the 1980s but he has seen how modern radical feminism has lost it's way it isn't the same anymore. Some say that Anne Marie Waters is a feminist.

Well, New Model Army (who took their name from Cromwell's army) were, like all alt bands of the 80's left wing but now also against populist political moments like Brexit (which are predominantly working class happenings), so it's a strange dicotomy. Haven't heard about Ivor Perry and Easterhouse for donkeys, so wouldn't have a clue what their feelings about Moz would be, though they were pretty hardcore socialist/Marxist back in the day. Stormzy? Not my bag.....I'm out of the age range:)
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Well done, Billy. At last someone, somewhere has the balls to call out Morrissey regarding his active involvement and support of hate incitement. The involvement isn't direct, as Billy made clear, but Morrissey's endorsement of alt-right views/organisation/political parties is having an impact; an negative impact. Just look at the level of racist, homophobic entryism into this forum?

The racists and dog whistlers in here will immediately rubbish what Billy has to say; none will write as eloquently or with as much passion.

Only yesterday both Reelfountain and Hoffman made homophobic comments, comments that later one of them attempted to described as humorous. They were not humorous but attacks on LGBT people, who apparently, have no right to shove their sexuality in society's face and who should return to the shadows. If you've ever experienced direct homophobia I can assure you it's no joking matter. In tandem with their abject racism these racist entryists have changed the very nature of this forum. They flood threads with racist or dog whistling statements with indecent haste changing the very nature of every thread.

Morrissey's endorsement of alt-right views/organisation/political parties has emboldened these racists to believe they have a home in this forum. Do they?

I think it's obvious that the haters feel at home in this forum. I'm not one for rose-tinted glasses; the site has, since I can recall, always had an aggressive, combatative and poisonous side to it. That said things changed, and changed beyond recognition, following Morrissey's endorsements of: For Britian, Farage, Tommy Robinson and The Brexit Party etc. The issue of racism has haunted Morrissey since 1991. He has, as far as I'm concerned, constantly made matters worse with what I now describe as Trumpish-style comments.

The recent glut of new 'fans' signifies that Morrissey-Solo is a safe and acceptable space in which to be racist, homophobic and far-right wing. Just take a look at the thousands of comments the new 'fans' have made in regard to: immigration, Muslims, black people, Jews and the LGBT community. Some of these new 'fans' have stated categorically that their intention is to propogate alt-right ideology. Others, the ones I'm more concerned of, are those that spout consistent hatred and then attempt to rationalise it.

Whoever would have thought that a Morrissey fan site would be a welcoming home to blatant homophobic hatred?

Billy Bragg has put himself on the line with his comments and I applaud him for that. I'm also grateful that he popped the bubble relating to Morrissey's recent claim that he supported For Britain due to its animal rights policies. Billy rightly pointed out the Animal Welfare Party would have been a better 'fit' if that was Morrissey's sole reason for supporting For Britain.

I used to enjoy this site. The tit bits of info, rare tracks being posted by kind people and some of the chit chat. Now ..... it's mostly filled with hatred - a home to the alt-right.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I hesitate to write this here. But I’ve spoken to Billy Bragg tonight, and about Morrissey.

I made my (pro ‘Mozzer’) position clear, and he was incredibly and surprisingly generous, in both listening and articulating his (strong) opposition.

Endearingly, he said he would welcome me coming to his gigs in a Morrissey T-shirt.

I got no sense of hate. And there was a smidgen of respect for Morrissey.

This was a man who knew life in terms of its difference, and in the importance of making a stance (to make a difference). I got no sense that he wanted to close Morrissey down by any means except open debate.

I discussed the idea of separating the art from the artist—and about how I find this impossible. And unnecessary. He really listened, and understood my point. I said that I found it problematic that he thought these were the only terms upon which a consensus—with an outspoken/disagreeable artist—could be achieved. He listened more.

He also flogged me a T-shirt. And I was delighted to own it.

God bless him. Never loved him more than I do tonight.

P.S. he spoke to lots of people, and was generous to everyone. Not just me.

I'm glad you took the time to share this. Unlike you, I have not been able to separate art from artist, and no longer describe myself as a Morrisey fan. I'm very much still a Smiths fan. Some may question me on that but I didn't make my decisions lightly.

To be a Morrissey fan and Billy Bragg fan at this specific moment in time has to feel a little awkward. Your conversation with Bragg sounds to me like a moment you'll treasure for a very long time to come. It would seem - and I know I'm reaching here - that Bragg would be keen to speak directly with Morrissey and that his comments were not made through spite but to engender debate in much the same way that Morrissey did with his own statements (not that I agree with those, you understand).

They key thing for me about your post is how open Bragg was with you and others and how he was able to articulate his views while respecting yours. He sounds like a terrribly nice guy in 'real life'.

I wouldn't encourage you to wear a Morrissey t-shirt to a Bragg concert. I'd strongly advise against wearing a Bragg t-shirt to a Morrissey gig :)
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
Well, New Model Army (who took their name from Cromwell's army) were, like all alt bands of the 80's left wing but now also against populist political moments like Brexit (which are predominantly working class happenings), so it's a strange dicotomy. Haven't heard about Ivor Perry and Easterhouse for donkeys, so wouldn't have a clue what their feelings about Moz would be, though they were pretty hardcore socialist/Marxist back in the day. Stormzy? Not my bag.....I'm out of the age range:)
I hope I'm recalling this right but I believe Perry was tried out, as a guitarist, by Morrissey shortly after Marr left The Smiths. I think I read (somewhere a long time ago) that it all ended incredibly badly and Perry was left feeling particularly sour.
 
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Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
I'm glad you took the time to share this. Unlike you, I have not been able to separate art from artist, and no longer describe myself as a Morrisey fan. I'm very much still a Smiths fan. Some may question me on that but I didn't make my decisions lightly.

To be a Morrissey fan and Billy Bragg fan at this specific moment in time has to feel a little awkward. Your conversation with Bragg sounds to me like a moment you'll treasure for a very long time to come. It would seem - and I know I'm reaching here - that Bragg would be keen to speak directly with Morrissey and that his comments were not made through spite but to engender debate in much the same way that Morrissey did with his own statements (not that I agree with those, you understand).

They key thing for me about your post is how open Bragg was with you and others and how he was able to articulate his views while respecting yours. He sounds like a terrribly nice guy in 'real life'.

I wouldn't encourage you to wear a Morrissey t-shirt to a Bragg concert. I'd strongly advise against wearing a Bragg t-shirt to a Morrissey gig :)
It was great to get a sense of the emotional character of his critique, along with its intellectual content. And yes, I will treasure the memory.

I think you might be onto something, with the T-shirt advice; I will dig out my Stone Roses clobber—which seems to please most people most of the time. At least for now.
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest

As an activist, I’m appalled by this transformation, but as a Smiths fan, I’m heartbroken.

It was Johnny Marr’s amazing guitar that drew me to the band, but I grasped that Morrissey was an exceptional lyricist when I heard ‘Reel Around the Fountain’. Ironically, it was a line that he had stolen that won my affections. “I dreamt about you last night and I fell out of bed twice” is spoken by Jimmy, the black sailor, to his white teenage lover, Jo, in Sheila Delaney’s play ‘A Taste of Honey’.

The 1961 movie, starring Rita Tushingham was an early example of a post-war British society that would embrace multi-racial relationships (and homosexuality too). By pilfering that particular line for the song, Morrissey was placing the Smiths in the great tradition of northern working class culture that may have been in the gutter, but was looking at the stars. Yet, by posting a white supremacist video in which he is quoted as saying “Everyone prefers their own race”, Morrissey undermines that line, erasing Jo and Jimmy and all those misfit lovers to whom the Smiths once gave so much encouragement.

This is a beautiful piece of writing. It's incredibly evocative. It exudes a palpable sense of loss. I too am heartbroken.
 

gashonthenail

Well-Known Member
I think it's obvious that the haters feel at home in this forum. I'm not one for rose-tinted glasses; the site has, since I can recall, always had an aggressive, combatative and poisonous side to it. That said things changed, and changed beyond recognition, following Morrissey's endorsements of: For Britian, Farage, Tommy Robinson and The Brexit Party etc. The issue of racism has haunted Morrissey since 1991. He has, as far as I'm concerned, constantly made matters worse with what I now describe as Trumpish-style comments.

The recent glut of new 'fans' signifies that Morrissey-Solo is a safe and acceptable space in which to be racist, homophobic and far-right wing. Just take a look at the thousands of comments the new 'fans' have made in regard to: immigration, Muslims, black people, Jews and the LGBT community. Some of these new 'fans' have stated categorically that their intention is to propogate alt-right ideology. Others, the ones I'm more concerned of, are those that spout consistent hatred and then attempt to rationalise it.

Whoever would have thought that a Morrissey fan site would be a welcoming home to blatant homophobic hatred?

Billy Bragg has put himself on the line with his comments and I applaud him for that. I'm also grateful that he popped the bubble relating to Morrissey's recent claim that he supported For Britain due to its animal rights policies. Billy rightly pointed out the Animal Welfare Party would have been a better 'fit' if that was Morrissey's sole reason for supporting For Britain.

I used to enjoy this site. The tit bits of info, rare tracks being posted by kind people and some of the chit chat. Now ..... it's mostly filled with hatred - a home to the alt-right.

You are absolutely right about this site being filled with hatred - but most of the hatred is directed at Mozzer. For having an opinion.
 

reelfountain

Well-Known Member
As an activist, I’m appalled by this transformation, but as a Smiths fan, I’m heartbroken.

It was Johnny Marr’s amazing guitar that drew me to the band, but I grasped that Morrissey was an exceptional lyricist when I heard ‘Reel Around the Fountain’. Ironically, it was a line that he had stolen that won my affections. “I dreamt about you last night and I fell out of bed twice” is spoken by Jimmy, the black sailor, to his white teenage lover, Jo, in Sheila Delaney’s play ‘A Taste of Honey’.

The 1961 movie, starring Rita Tushingham was an early example of a post-war British society that would embrace multi-racial relationships (and homosexuality too). By pilfering that particular line for the song, Morrissey was placing the Smiths in the great tradition of northern working class culture that may have been in the gutter, but was looking at the stars. Yet, by posting a white supremacist video in which he is quoted as saying “Everyone prefers their own race”, Morrissey undermines that line, erasing Jo and Jimmy and all those misfit lovers to whom the Smiths once gave so much encouragement.

This is a beautiful piece of writing. It's incredibly evocative. It exudes a palpable sense of loss. I too am heartbroken.
Only Billy Bragg could attempt to bring toxic identity politics into the poetry of Reel Around the Fountain.
 

reelfountain

Well-Known Member
I think it's obvious that the haters feel at home in this forum. I'm not one for rose-tinted glasses; the site has, since I can recall, always had an aggressive, combatative and poisonous side to it. That said things changed, and changed beyond recognition, following Morrissey's endorsements of: For Britian, Farage, Tommy Robinson and The Brexit Party etc. The issue of racism has haunted Morrissey since 1991. He has, as far as I'm concerned, constantly made matters worse with what I now describe as Trumpish-style comments.

The recent glut of new 'fans' signifies that Morrissey-Solo is a safe and acceptable space in which to be racist, homophobic and far-right wing. Just take a look at the thousands of comments the new 'fans' have made in regard to: immigration, Muslims, black people, Jews and the LGBT community. Some of these new 'fans' have stated categorically that their intention is to propogate alt-right ideology. Others, the ones I'm more concerned of, are those that spout consistent hatred and then attempt to rationalise it.

Whoever would have thought that a Morrissey fan site would be a welcoming home to blatant homophobic hatred?

Billy Bragg has put himself on the line with his comments and I applaud him for that. I'm also grateful that he popped the bubble relating to Morrissey's recent claim that he supported For Britain due to its animal rights policies. Billy rightly pointed out the Animal Welfare Party would have been a better 'fit' if that was Morrissey's sole reason for supporting For Britain.

I used to enjoy this site. The tit bits of info, rare tracks being posted by kind people and some of the chit chat. Now ..... it's mostly filled with hatred - a home to the alt-right.
Morrissey-Solo: the new acceptable place to have an opinion.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Well, New Model Army (who took their name from Cromwell's army) were, like all alt bands of the 80's left wing but now also against populist political moments like Brexit (which are predominantly working class happenings), so it's a strange dicotomy. Haven't heard about Ivor Perry and Easterhouse for donkeys, so wouldn't have a clue what their feelings about Moz would be, though they were pretty hardcore socialist/Marxist back in the day. Stormzy? Not my bag.....I'm out of the age range:)
NMA and the levellers were awful smelly leftist cunts. Easterhouse were useless beyond belief.

"Oysterhoose"
 
0

001

Guest
I think it's obvious that the haters feel at home in this forum. I'm not one for rose-tinted glasses; the site has, since I can recall, always had an aggressive, combatative and poisonous side to it. That said things changed, and changed beyond recognition, following Morrissey's endorsements of: For Britian, Farage, Tommy Robinson and The Brexit Party etc. The issue of racism has haunted Morrissey since 1991. He has, as far as I'm concerned, constantly made matters worse with what I now describe as Trumpish-style comments.

The recent glut of new 'fans' signifies that Morrissey-Solo is a safe and acceptable space in which to be racist, homophobic and far-right wing. Just take a look at the thousands of comments the new 'fans' have made in regard to: immigration, Muslims, black people, Jews and the LGBT community. Some of these new 'fans' have stated categorically that their intention is to propogate alt-right ideology. Others, the ones I'm more concerned of, are those that spout consistent hatred and then attempt to rationalise it.

Whoever would have thought that a Morrissey fan site would be a welcoming home to blatant homophobic hatred?

Billy Bragg has put himself on the line with his comments and I applaud him for that. I'm also grateful that he popped the bubble relating to Morrissey's recent claim that he supported For Britain due to its animal rights policies. Billy rightly pointed out the Animal Welfare Party would have been a better 'fit' if that was Morrissey's sole reason for supporting For Britain.

I used to enjoy this site. The tit bits of info, rare tracks being posted by kind people and some of the chit chat. Now ..... it's mostly filled with hatred - a home to the alt-right.

All of that is down to Dave (site admin) not giving a crap. Even though he's "looking for ways to improve the site". Not even lying. That's what he said. Have a look in the 'Site Feedback / Suggestions' section.
 

Stephen Hofmann

Well-Known Member
NMA and the levellers were awful smelly leftist cunts. Easterhouse were useless beyond belief.

"Oysterhoose"

The phrase was "Crusty's". I went to a NMA gig once. Half of them wore the obligotory clogs. Funny. No Rest for the Wicked is a wicked toon though and so was a lot of Easterhouses first album. Big fan of of the second album's "Come Out Fighting".

 

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