Johnny Marr opens up about his relationship with Morrissey - Esquire

Link posted by an anonymous person (original post):

Johnny Marr Is a Fan First and a Musician Second - Esquire
The Smiths cofounder opens up about his new memoir, the music that inspired him, and his relationship with Morrissey.

Excerpt:

Well, a lot of people would not have wanted to collaborate with Morrissey. He's an unusual guy, and you were young—young guys are pretty unforgiving. But you didn't see him as odd, or see the things another young person might see and not like about him.

I didn't really care about any of that. I just wanted a singer. We had a really, really strong friendship, right away. Let me put it this way: You don't just manufacture luck. If you're just sitting around f***ing talking about it, it won't happen. I did actually have to go and find out Morrissey's address. I had to go back to the projects, and I had to knock on the door of strangers to get his address. And to get to that address, I had to get on a f***ing bus, and ride for forever.

I knew it was ballsy. But I had this spirit of rock and roll in me. It was this sort of rock and roll idealism, but I was by no means naive. I did plenty of walking around the streets at night kicking cans with nowhere to go. That happened a lot. And that kind of desperation can dampen your spirit, and I had to fight against it all the time. So I kept the juice going on a natural optimism. When my friends were shooting each other up, I had to just buck up and be on my own. That was tough. That was year zero, you know? That was pretty bleak. So, you know, I was putting my faith in magic. But I'd been through plenty that I knew what bleak was. I'd watched my dad everyday digging f***ing holes in the road, and my mates with no jobs. And the only thing I had going for me was my guitar and positivity and my girlfriend.

...

Any Smiths fan reading this would kill me if I didn't ask about your meeting a few years ago with Morrissey.

I get it. What was great about writing about it was that, I think by accident, in just telling how it was, I almost demystify it. Because there it is, just two old friends sat in a pub. Very ho-hum.

But to any fan, that story is apocryphal. It's, "Oh my God, where are we headed?" But actually, we're not headed anywhere, and it turns out it is just two old friends catching up.

That's what I mean about demystifying it. I understand how people might see it, but I never went to that meeting with Morrissey with any intention or even notion that we were going to be talking about the band coming back together. But I was intrigued. And it was a really, really interesting conversation, and I was really, really pleased that we connected, and we did what we always did: We talked about what records we liked. There he was, talking all about Shocking Blue, who are a Dutch band, and I couldn't get him off that subject! And then I was talking all about Portland, Oregon—because that was a big subject for me at that time—and all the other bands I was into at the time.

Well, that was always the basis of the relationship.

Right. That's the thing we'd always had in common. Our personalities are still so different, though, so I guess nothing's changed. But it's one of the things people want to know about because it's an interesting story and for me to write my life story and not put that in the book would really just be f***in' weird. And I'm glad to actually share it with people.

For me the story feels like a period, but to other people it probably feels like "dot dot dot." I guess that's the difference: It's what people take away from it. To me it feels as though, even while you're telling it, you don't want to go backwards.

Yeah, that's right. Musicians understand that. Sometimes fans don't. So I can understand to the outside world—to fans—that really what they would want to have next is for us to start sitting in meetings with a bunch of business people for about five months planning albums and tours, but that's just not going to happen.


Related item:
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
Another interview, the same boring talk... When will people stop bothering both Johnny and Moz with these questions?
 

gonzax

Junior Member
It was not boring at all in my opinion, it was very interesting. I, at least, really wanted to know how that meeting came about. I am reading Marr's book these days and I am enjoying it a lot.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Yeah I liked that one a bit. Felt less like a pro interview on johnnys part and it felt like he opened up a bit more. He sounded a bit less diplomatic and a more honest. I dunno, I liked it. I still wanna see him do something with rourke. It'd be interesting to see what comes of it and it'd be a lot less pressure on that project than if he did something with morrissey
 

g23

Always crashing in the same car
It would be fun to lock him and Morrissey in a large cupboard with a quart of juice (for Johnny), a quart of vodka (for Moz) and an acoustic guitar.
 

Cornflakes

"A bit iffy" ★★☆☆☆ - AV Club
It was not boring at all in my opinion, it was very interesting. I, at least, really wanted to know how that meeting came about. I am reading Marr's book these days and I am enjoying it a lot.

I enjoyed it too. Has to be said it's not as good as most of his interviews, though.
 

marred

Member
Well, a lot of people would not have wanted to collaborate with Morrissey. He's an unusual guy, and you were young—young guys are pretty unforgiving. But you didn't see him as odd, or see the things another young person might see and not like about him.

Thank god Johnny wasn't as closed minded as some people on this forum.
 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><><><><>
It would be fun to lock him and Morrissey in a large cupboard with a quart of juice (for Johnny), a quart of vodka (for Moz) and an acoustic guitar.

you can bet there wouldn't be much song writing going on ;)
 

King Leer

Leering since '97
Something struck me while watching one of Marr's book-related interviews where he talked about his lifelong relationship with Angie. Remember that melodramatic slam against Suede that Morrissey once uttered:
"Brett Anderson will never forgive God for not making him Angie Bowie"

I get the feeling that some part of that, probably unconsciously, is Moz saying he wished he were Angie Marr.
 

King Leer

Leering since '97
Something struck me while watching one of Marr's book-related interviews where he talked about his lifelong relationship with Angie. Remember that melodramatic slam against Suede that Morrissey once uttered:
"Brett Anderson will never forgive God for not making him Angie Bowie"

I get the feeling that some part of that, probably unconsciously, is Moz saying he wished he were Angie Marr. Meaning the one person Jonny would never leave.
 

marred

Member
Something struck me while watching one of Marr's book-related interviews where he talked about his lifelong relationship with Angie. Remember that melodramatic slam against Suede that Morrissey once uttered:
"Brett Anderson will never forgive God for not making him Angie Bowie"

I get the feeling that some part of that, probably unconsciously, is Moz saying he wished he were Angie Marr.
Well that is some stretch.
 

AztecCamera

Well-Known Member
I reckon he should open up about how much he and Steve get paid for their "secret" corporate gigs in America.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Something struck me while watching one of Marr's book-related interviews where he talked about his lifelong relationship with Angie. Remember that melodramatic slam against Suede that Morrissey once uttered:
"Brett Anderson will never forgive God for not making him Angie Bowie"

I get the feeling that some part of that, probably unconsciously, is Moz saying he wished he were Angie Marr.

Was it a rock that struck you?
 

Guernie

Member
Nice answer to the first question. I guessed Johnny just had Moz's address and just went to his door . Glad to here the "rest of the story". I really need to get this book !
 

g23

Always crashing in the same car
you can bet there wouldn't be much song writing going on ;)
Unless you are one of the two I mentioned, then your opinion is fairly irrelevant. Unless this is going in a creepy slash fiction direction. In which case, please, do go on.
 

gordyboy9

its not me its you.
does johnny think hes living in the Bronx,BACK TO THE ROJECTS, for f***s sake its a council estate,there was almost zero gun crime in Britain in the early eighties,,unless it was a bank job or the i.r.a. and here was jonboys mate running around firearmed to the teeth.he will be talking with an American accent next.
 

Quando quando quando

Well-Known Member
Link posted by an anonymous person (original post):

Johnny Marr Is a Fan First and a Musician Second - Esquire
The Smiths cofounder opens up about his new memoir, the music that inspired him, and his relationship with Morrissey.

Excerpt:

Well, a lot of people would not have wanted to collaborate with Morrissey. He's an unusual guy, and you were young—young guys are pretty unforgiving. But you didn't see him as odd, or see the things another young person might see and not like about him.

I didn't really care about any of that. I just wanted a singer. We had a really, really strong friendship, right away. Let me put it this way: You don't just manufacture luck. If you're just sitting around f***ing talking about it, it won't happen. I did actually have to go and find out Morrissey's address. I had to go back to the projects, and I had to knock on the door of strangers to get his address. And to get to that address, I had to get on a f***ing bus, and ride for forever.

I knew it was ballsy. But I had this spirit of rock and roll in me. It was this sort of rock and roll idealism, but I was by no means naive. I did plenty of walking around the streets at night kicking cans with nowhere to go. That happened a lot. And that kind of desperation can dampen your spirit, and I had to fight against it all the time. So I kept the juice going on a natural optimism. When my friends were shooting each other up, I had to just buck up and be on my own. That was tough. That was year zero, you know? That was pretty bleak. So, you know, I was putting my faith in magic. But I'd been through plenty that I knew what bleak was. I'd watched my dad everyday digging f***ing holes in the road, and my mates with no jobs. And the only thing I had going for me was my guitar and positivity and my girlfriend.

...

Any Smiths fan reading this would kill me if I didn't ask about your meeting a few years ago with Morrissey.

I get it. What was great about writing about it was that, I think by accident, in just telling how it was, I almost demystify it. Because there it is, just two old friends sat in a pub. Very ho-hum.

But to any fan, that story is apocryphal. It's, "Oh my God, where are we headed?" But actually, we're not headed anywhere, and it turns out it is just two old friends catching up.

That's what I mean about demystifying it. I understand how people might see it, but I never went to that meeting with Morrissey with any intention or even notion that we were going to be talking about the band coming back together. But I was intrigued. And it was a really, really interesting conversation, and I was really, really pleased that we connected, and we did what we always did: We talked about what records we liked. There he was, talking all about Shocking Blue, who are a Dutch band, and I couldn't get him off that subject! And then I was talking all about Portland, Oregon—because that was a big subject for me at that time—and all the other bands I was into at the time.

Well, that was always the basis of the relationship.

Right. That's the thing we'd always had in common. Our personalities are still so different, though, so I guess nothing's changed. But it's one of the things people want to know about because it's an interesting story and for me to write my life story and not put that in the book would really just be f***in' weird. And I'm glad to actually share it with people.

For me the story feels like a period, but to other people it probably feels like "dot dot dot." I guess that's the difference: It's what people take away from it. To me it feels as though, even while you're telling it, you don't want to go backwards.

Yeah, that's right. Musicians understand that. Sometimes fans don't. So I can understand to the outside world—to fans—that really what they would want to have next is for us to start sitting in meetings with a bunch of business people for about five months planning albums and tours, but that's just not going to happen.


Related item:

The most interesting part for me was when Johnny Marr said this:
" There he was, talking all about Shocking Blue, who are a Dutch band, and I couldn't get him off that subject! "

They were from my town and I really like them too!
I knew of course he had an affection for them, as showed in his pre-show videos.

I like it Moz gets really excited and can go on about it. Still think he has that spontaneous excitement and uses it in his music.

By the way, didn't read the book yet, but does Johnny Marr mention anything new about music he gets exited about?
Something not really known until now?
 
does johnny think hes living in the Bronx,BACK TO THE ROJECTS, for f***s sake its a council estate,there was almost zero gun crime in Britain in the early eighties,,unless it was a bank job or the i.r.a. and here was jonboys mate running around firearmed to the teeth.he will be talking with an American accent next.
I agree with you about the "projects" it's very melodramatic, but when he mentions shooting each other up I think he's talking about heroin not guns
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I reckon he should open up about how much he and Steve get paid for their "secret" corporate gigs in America.

Remember, you are to label your posts, "I'm now trying to be funny", just so that we all understand. Thanks.
 

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