Mozipedia - your thoughts?

Jukebox Jury

Retired
do you know how much it would cost? maybe i could have you ship it to where i'm staying in maine and i could read it on the plane on the way back.

I'll weigh it at the post office today and tell you how much it weighs, you'll have to find out how much it would cost to ship that weight inside the USA.
The book will cost $33 (£20) unless it is cheaper at Fopp Records (I'll nip in this afternoon).

Anyone else fancy a copy?

Jukebox Jury
 
I'll weigh it at the post office today and tell you how much it weighs, you'll have to find out how much it would cost to ship that weight inside the USA.
The book will cost $33 (£20) unless it is cheaper at Fopp Records (I'll nip in this afternoon).

Anyone else fancy a copy?

Jukebox Jury

Do they have it at Fopp JJ?
There's one not far from me. My local bookshop has sold out. :(
 

sistasheila

tjekket
the current q issue have a review of mozipedia (ionly looked through it t the newsaget dont own it
 

Max Bialy

Girlfriend in Tacoma
I've only read the first half so far, but it's so enormously entertaining that I never want it to end...
The only criticisms I have are Goddard's tendency (though to a lesser extent than in "Songs that saved your life") to needlessly stick the knife in to other artists he personally deems inferior, not to mention his overblown antipathy towards certain tracks like "Golden lights" – again...
But other than that, I think it's a fantastic book.
 

sweetness522

My one true love
I was reading the book before bed and the funniest entry is "swimming". I could not contain my laughter when Moz says he likes to dive between people's legs and come out the other side. "I don't loiter". :lbf: Has to be one of the funniest quotes in the book.
 

Maurice E

Junior Member
yeah, top marks to Goddard.
he has performed a bit of a u-turn though.
after writing "The Songs That Saved Your Life" he was asked about doing a similar book for the solo stuff and replied (words to the effect) that he would find it hard to be enthusiastic about the task given the much lower quality of so many of the songs...
 

Otis

New Member
Got mine within 2 days on free delivery from Amazon. Am loving it - can spend hours surfing the book from one link to the next. An electronic version would be good. Could have done with an index but, hell, it's already getting through enough trees as it is, and the cross refs come in handy.

The one thing I'm taking an issue with is Vini Reilly, who I adore, and whose entry plays down his contributions on Viva Hate by filtering Street's rather disparaging comments. What I find frustrating is that the 'Late Night, Maudlin Street' entry cites Street praising Vini's piano part on it, which is a nice touch, but what about the guitar playing, for crying out loud? The piano is a moment, but the Vini guitar is highly prominent from minute 4.00 on. Paresi's excellent drumming on it gets praise in his entry, but no ref to the guitar. For me the guitar playing is pure magic, hinting at the genius that could have come from Street's inspired pairing of Moz with Manchester's other guitar genius had things worked out. Reilly's unmistakable cadences and delay effects, the very nuanced emotional feel of it, in the context of one of Morrissey's great lyrics and performances is unbeatable. And he doesn't mention it!

This being my first post here and all, I have no idea if this topic has been discussed ever on this forum, but would be very keen to know if people here are similarly spellbound by this magical combination.

As a Mozlover but lightweight (compared to people here), I had no idea about Moz's love of Joni Mitchell, nor had it ever occurred to me that 'another false alarm' might be a direct echo of her brilliant 'Amelia'. I'm delighted to find this kind of stuff, and it's what I love about the book. Nor did I know that the loud electric drum beat that anchors the above LNMS was lifted from fellow Joni-lover (as Goddard observes) Prince's 'Housequake'.
 

Je Suis Julie

allyouneedismorrissey.com
Some info for those in the US...

I ordered my copy using the "More Buying Choices - New / Used" link on Amazon.com. My NEW copy arrived today from The_Book_Depository. ($31.50 + $3.99 shipping). I ordered it last Tuesday and it just arrived today, so it took less than a week - not bad considering it actually shipped from the UK!

It looks like a great read, I can't wait to dive in tonight!*

*EDIT: Except for the part where he says Kristeen Young is "operatically bonkers" and that audiences "were more often than not repelled by her screechy hubbub akin to Dame Kiri Te Kanawa being lowered feet first into a tree pulper." Not everyone thought that :(
 
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joe frady

Vile Refusenik
Peeking and peeking and peeking, before y'know it's 2am, even the Big Brother housemeats are in bed, and you have to be up for work in 3 hours. Oh well.....
'HOGG, Peter' is a trés juicy entry. Rentachap indeed!
Oh and on the Tim Broad issue, he is refered to throughout; his promotional films are detailed within the entries for each of the songs they were promoting. It's just that for some reason Goddard didn't think it practical to have a standalone entry for BROAD, Tim.
 

Maurice E

Junior Member
Got mine within 2 days on free delivery from Amazon. Am loving it - can spend hours surfing the book from one link to the next. An electronic version would be good. Could have done with an index but, hell, it's already getting through enough trees as it is, and the cross refs come in handy.

The one thing I'm taking an issue with is Vini Reilly, who I adore, and whose entry plays down his contributions on Viva Hate by filtering Street's rather disparaging comments. What I find frustrating is that the 'Late Night, Maudlin Street' entry cites Street praising Vini's piano part on it, which is a nice touch, but what about the guitar playing, for crying out loud? The piano is a moment, but the Vini guitar is highly prominent from minute 4.00 on. Paresi's excellent drumming on it gets praise in his entry, but no ref to the guitar. For me the guitar playing is pure magic, hinting at the genius that could have come from Street's inspired pairing of Moz with Manchester's other guitar genius had things worked out. Reilly's unmistakable cadences and delay effects, the very nuanced emotional feel of it, in the context of one of Morrissey's great lyrics and performances is unbeatable. And he doesn't mention it!

This being my first post here and all, I have no idea if this topic has been discussed ever on this forum, but would be very keen to know if people here are similarly spellbound by this magical combination.

Yeah, the guitar (and the keyboard) work in Maudlin Street is indeed quite spell binding.
Don't remember much musical analysis of the song round these parts. People tend to focus on the lyrics but check this thread (help, I'm beginning to sound like a mod!) where we got to vote on the song a year or two back.
http://forums.morrissey-solo.com/showthread.php?t=76554
 

Jones

Senior Member
I think he probably got more cooperation with Street than Reilly.

I don't get the impression that Godard isn't very critical about the facts he collates or the people he interviews. He tends to take things on face value and doesn't question what he is told. So if he interviewed Street and not Reilly he will go along with Street's tendency to write out Reilly's contributions to Viva Hate.
 
G

goinghome

Guest
Goddard does not include either a poet - W.H. Auden - or his poem, written about a date that has its 70th anniversary today, both of which have been mentioned before as fodder for Morrissey's work. The poem is 1st September 1939 and contains lines remarkably similar to some in both There is a Light That Never Goes Out, and Ask . You can read it here - http://www.poemdujour.com/Sept1.1939.html . Goddard describes Ask as The Smiths at their most petty which, given the progression of themes from individual self-expression to the consequences of humanity choosing war over love, plain baffles me.

Goddard shovels up some hysterical phrases himself, such as how Shirley Bassey is "blessed with a preposterous voice that could buckle scaffolding". He steps over the line sometimes e.g. on Best Friend on the Payroll: "Whyte's slowly uncoiling melody and Morrissey's prolonged silences sustained great tension between his sporadic outbursts, his head seemingly so buried in the 'Removals' section of Yellow Pages he'd forgotten to supply half the lyrics". :eek:

There's oodles of interest that either stirs the memory, or is new knowledge (has Stanley Baker been mentioned before much?) And I'm still only on the 'B' entries! :popcorn:
 

CharlieFairhead

Loweringthetonesince1974
I wonder what Morrissey makes of it? Don't kid yourselves that he won't have a copy. There he is closing the door, putting the lights out and fumbling for his copy of Mozipedia.
 

Barking

Well-Known Member
...Might take a couple of red pens to correct it. Hell, a battalion of red pens, even...Oh well. Sadly I have enough on my correcting plate now :D

Morrissey, however, who's sitting there at his computer desk doing absolutely f.a...:rolleyes: You'd think he'd have found an occupation really...:rolleyes: Instead of just sitting there rolling his eyes :rolleyes: with that irritating knowing superior smirk :rolleyes:

Pity people are too busy and uninterested to give out wallops...:thumb:
 
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